ita | eng
SEARCH BY YEAR

Ian Davenport

10/05/2016 - 23/07/2016

Lunedì / Sabato 10-13  15-19
Monday / Saturday 10-13  15-19
 
L’esposizione  è  accompagnata da un catalogo con testi di Pia Capelli e Sarah Shalgosky.
 
The exhibition  is  accompanied   by  a  catalog with texts by Pia Capelli and Sarah Shalgosky.

Represented Artists:
IAN DAVENPORT

Ian Davenport, born in Sidcup, Kent in 1966 and graduated from London’s Goldsmiths College of Art, soon emerged among the most promising of the so-called YBAs, Young British Artists, and in 1991 was the youngest artist  ever nominated for the Turner Prize.
Since the 1980s, Davenport abandoned his early figurative approach and devoted himself to abstraction, having paint as a medium and as a subject at the same time.
Moving through different phases of his experimentation, he developed a very recognisable style. In Davenport’s paintings, colours are studied to create a visual rythm that moves between absolute freedom – the paint is dripped, poured - and a strong control of the painted matter, obtained through unconventional tools such as syringes.
Works on show:
The “Poured Lines” series from 2005-2008 is on show with two works on paper, rarely shown before: colour studies Davenport made when working on a large mural underneath Southwark Bridge, in London.
In contrast, the two “Staggered Lines” pieces from 2010-11 are more fragmented, and the compositions more varied. The marks appear to grow upwards.
The show moves toward the present with more recent works from 2013-2015, and some paintings never shown before: among these, some of the “d’aprés” Davenport paints after masterpieces by Old Masters.
In his very successful series “Puddle Paintings”, the artist “extracts” the palette from painters such as Carpaccio and Van Gogh, dominating colours with the greatest precision in the upper portion of the painting, and letting them puddle on the bottom of it, in a play between control and chaos. 

On the occasion of the exhibition, Tega is publishing a book featuring a critical essay by Sarah Shalgosky and a conversation between Ian Davenport and Pia Capelli.


Artartworks